The last short story

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This is the last short story I’ll post in a while, as I’m getting back to working on a new novel. This one is called The Rake. It’s a grim story of things going wrong for a cop, and his encounter with the paranormal.

Don’t forget, you have today and tomorrow to download, for free, the Kindle versions of my new books! Thanks to all who have already done so!

I hope everybody’s well! Take care!

Yet another short story

Here’s another short story I wrote. It’s a little sad, but it’s based on a true story:

The Burglar

Hope you guys like it!

Don’t forget, you have until Friday to download my 2 new books, for free on Kindle. They ain’t great, but they sure ’nuff was fun to write:

 

I hope everybody’s well, and, as always, I’d appreciate some feedback on the short story!

Have a good day!

Published!

Well, self published anyway. I got tired of rejection letters from agents who didn’t even want to read the books, so I published them on my own. I will be working on marketing them in the future.

A Pack of Dogs is the story of Jacob Baxter, who finds himself the last man on Earth. An old trope, I know, but this time, a considerable amount of time has passed, and several members of the animal kingdom have ascended to sapience. Things go wrong after wrong when Jacob finds himself on a journey to save what may be the remnants of mankind.

Index, Washington is the story of, well, Index, Washington, and some of the people that live there. Unbeknownst to them, an ancient evil, buried deep in the Cascade Mountains, is stirring to life, with nothing but bad intentions. Five people find themselves on a collision course with the paranormal and the supernatural, with cataclysmic results.

 

The paperback versions are $15 and $10, respectively. That’s as cheap as I could print them. The Kindle versions are 99 cents, and from now until Friday, the Kindle versions are free!

That’s right, the Kindle version is free! What have you got to lose, except a few hours of reading bad fiction that you’ll never get back! Wait, what! Anyway, if you do download it, I’d appreciate a review on Amazon. Honest is fine!

Please support small/struggling/local artists, and please let me know what you think of the work!

If anyone wants to give them an honest review, and post something to Goodreads or their blog, let me know, and I will send you a copy.

Hope everybody’s well!

new short story

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I’ve posted a new short story, called A Visit to Langley.

This one is a little long, at 8k words, but it was a blast to write. It’s HP Lovecraft meets the Twilight Zone. As always, please enjoy, and, if you get a chance, let me know what you think.

It’s a little rated R due to language and subject matter, but it’s not too bad.

Hope everybody’s well!

another short story

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Here’s another short story. It’s called Another Day At School. This one is not quite so nice as the previous one I posted. In fact, if you are not a fan of violence, skip this one.

Again, feel free to let me know what you think.

Have a nice day!

short story

I added a short story called ‘Kaleb’ to my web page. If people could check it out, and let me know what they think, that would be great.

It’s a (mostly) true story of a dog I knew. It’s emotionally manipulative, but, hey, what story about a dog is not emotionally manipulative?

Anyway, it’s in the short story section at the top of the page. Give it a read, and let me know what you think.

Hope everybody’s well!

 

 

Suicide and writing

I realize this isn’t a fun thing to talk about…

Just because of the brain I have, when I write, I invariably include a suicide that one of my protagonists has had to endure, usually a close family member. I find that this brings a rich vulnerability to the character, and makes them far more human. It gives them a depth of emotional range that is a rich pallet to write about.

Let me just say that suicide is the ultimate form of terrorism. It destroys those that are left behind. It ruins those that must go on. Lives are shattered, forever. Those that remain will be asking ‘why’ until the day they die.

However, as someone who has dealt with mental illness, I understand the need to want to kill the pain. I understand the suffering that says you can’t go on. But here is the thing: You can go on. You can get better. I’ve lost two close friends to suicide, and I wish I could bring them back, because it does get better. Depression is a transient illness.

Anyway, back to writing. When you have a character that has suffered that kind of loss, the range of emotions you get to play with, as a writer, increases dramatically. The character can become more believable, more rich in their emotional depth. Good writing is drama, and drama is conflict, and nothing conflicts better than those that have suffered.

I would be remiss if I did not mention this, the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, 1-800-273-8255.

Anyway, that’s all for now. Hope everybody’s well! Take care,

Andrick

index

Mental illness and writing characters

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When I write my fiction, it’s easy to get inside the characters’ heads, coming from my perspective. I struggle with anxiety and depression, and this can translate quite handily when I build a character. Hey, write what you know.

As a writer, I take on the form of omniscient narrator, master storyteller. That means that I have complete control over what my characters think and do. I almost write from a position of envy, because if I wanted to, I could completely take away a character’s mental illness. That would damage the narrative, but it is interesting to contemplate.

It gives a writer a sense of power to have complete control over these characters that they have created. In a way, I see it as projecting my desire to have control over my own head. Which is another thing entirely.

I think every writer will, at some level, transpose some of their own illness, or quirkiness, into their characters. This makes them more relatable, more believable. I’m not saying that every writer out there is mentally ill, but you can probably see it from where they’re standing. That’s what makes us all artists. Our lovable quirkiness.

But this is the realm of my fiction. In the end, it is medical treatment, and my profound faith in a higher power, that things can and are improving. Now if I could just finish the damn novel.

I love David Lynch, but he’s wrong

Let me just say I’m a big fan of David Lynch. His unique creativity is a standout in pop culture, and I loved Twin Peaks, at least the first two seasons.

Lynch wrote a book called Catching the Big Fish, which I reach recently, about transcendental meditation. It’s a good read, and, indeed, the therapy might be good for some people seeking relief from mental illness.

I took umbrage with part of the book. In it, he tells a story, possibly apocryphal, about going to see a psychiatrist. (David Lynch has mental illness problems? Who knew?) Anyway, Lynch asks the doctor if the treatment could damage his creativity. The doctor replies there’s a chance it could. Lynch shakes the man’s hand, refuses the treatment, and moves on.

What absolute crap. This story is as full of horseshit as Twin Peaks season 3. No doctor would ever say that, and besides, it’s just not true. Treating your mental illness, by whatever means, will NOT damage your creativity. I have been in a great recovery for some time now, and I’ve never written so much, nor have I enjoyed it so much.

I guess my bottom line is, don’t listen to the people who tell you that mental illness treatment will damage you. It will not. The goal is to make you better. Are there side effects to medications? Sure, but they sure as sugar don’t damage your creativity. And it beats drowning in a living hell.

Maybe I’m just bitter about Twin Peaks season 3. Just my thoughts.

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Writing and Depression

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What I wanted to write about today is writing and depression. Specifically, writing for depression and writing with depression.

There is no question that, in the treatment of depression, that writing is an invaluable tool. I myself have used it countless times, and in fact, my therapist has me keep a depression journal. It is empowering to see those roiling, cruel thoughts put down on paper, because then they have substance, a body, if you will, and can be more easily addressed. That mass of chaos that exists in your head, beating you down, has less power when it’s listed on paper. You can then address each one, separate from its nefarious cohorts, and begin to take back your power. This is writing for depression.

Writing with depression is also therapeutic. I have found, in my own fiction writings, in my own stories, that the mental illness can actually be a bit of an asset. Not that it’s fun to have, but it it’s there, why not use it? Anyway, when I write about a character I’ve created who is in an awful predicament, as I often do, I find I can draw upon my own experiences with depression, thus giving the character a deeper soul, a more rich personality. If you are familiar with the dark colors of depression, it’s an easy image to paint. Thus the characters become more human, more believable.

Anyway, these are just my thoughts. I hope everyone is doing well, and is having great success with their writing and/or recovery. See you soon!

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